You are here

Album of the Week: Principles of Geometry – ‘Burn the Land & Boil the Oceans’

Despite the rather scary title album number three isn’t particularly threatening.

By Spotlight


Artist: Principles of Geometry
Album: Burn the Land & Boil the Oceans
Label: Tigersushi
Release Date: 30/04/2012

After managing to grab plenty of attention with their first, self-titled album the pair also known as Guillaume Grosso and Jeremy Duval then turned more heads in the world of IDM and experimental electronic-fare with their second LP. Fans of John Carpenter soundtracks, Mux Mool, Warp, and Com Truise are certainly going to be rather excited then, as 2012 marks a third coming for the duo. 

Despite the rather scary title album number three isn’t particularly threatening. OK, so it is rather obscure, and there is an underlying sense of unease- as if the machines used to make these nostalgically futuristic tunes may well be plotting against us- but still, it’s not quite the apocalyptic moment one might be expecting.

This becomes abundantly clear when Dam Aicoab drops its mildly uplifting synth on top of a classic Casio bassline. Set to a slow electro tempo it’s as close to high concept Hollywood as you’re going to find in the middle of a production album like this, unless the tune in question is selected to soundtrack a big budget movie (which wouldn’t be too surprising, except for the fact it’s not 1986 anymore and tastes have changed). 

Digressions to one side hopefully you get the point. If not let us direct uncertain ears towards the unnervingly titled Enoma, a track comprising all the tracking rhythm section of a true instrumental Korg ballad, realised (thankfully) sans vocals, with significant attention to detail and an appreciation for timbre. Like everything else on here it’s cinematic to say the least, and as with any good narrative there are a few twists along the way too. 

Mongrel, for instance, is clearly informed by electroclash’s heyday, flashing menacing analogue keys and distorted, dance-punk vocals like snarling teeth the nastiness of said genre is retained but transposed to roughly 120 BPM. Once it’s there a f-ilthy funk sample is dropped in the middle, begging the question; Prince v The Hacker, anyone?

Similarly unique sounds are found on potential show stealer Deerhunt, which lays glittering background keys and a swathe of expansive synth notes atop a snare-roll-filled drum pattern. Throw in some rather well worked Buck 65-cum-Chilly Gonzales style spoken word lyricism and voila- experimental joy. In short, these beats and bleeps aren’t going to make you dance, but they will force you to sit up, listen, and take note.

soundcloud.com/principles-of-geometry

tigersushi.com

Tags:


Related content

The British artist has his first full length foray on Systematic Recordings.
He's opened for Aphex Twin and has the support of Flying Lotus, listen to why with his debut album.
Sasha's stormed a night or two in his time, but at the tips of his fingertips is a storm of a...
The artist debuts with a full-length album mixing old glories with potent new material.
Toronto trio drops a hustle and bustle of multi-genres in their new EP.
The four best albums from last year according to our deeply perceptive ears.
The Balearic beacon beams down with a compilation that transports you to a dream-like state of...
Dâm-Funk hits us with an ear bending 20-tracked offering with his ever celestial sound in Invite...
Take a peak inside Nils Frahm's musical box.
An eclectic and intricately woven journey into Joris Voorn’s favourites.
The magic of changing light, in music.


Latest news

Industry movers and shakers discuss summer 2016

Yesterday

Circoloco's horsepower races with the techno fiends

Yesterday

All the biggest names in house, trance and bass

Yesterday

Featured Ibiza beach

Yesterday

Ushuaïa founder leads the discussion on Ibiza's biggest talking points

1 day ago

The famous San Antonio club is officially open

2 days ago

Sunday roast and poolside shenanigans at Pikes

2 days ago